#ThirdShiftSJ and Gallery Hop

This past Friday Uptown Saint John played canvas to both a gallery-hop and a special even called Third-Shift. Third-Shift an event put on by Third Space Gallery that aims to put art in vacant and underused spaces to inspire people and help re-energize the area. I’d just heard of it happening a few days beforehand and had never been on a Gallery Hop either. So I strapped on my walking shoes, grabbed a couple rolls of HP5 out of the fridge and started walking.  Continue reading “#ThirdShiftSJ and Gallery Hop”

The Challenge

I’m a big fan of photographing strangers when abroad. It’s a fine way to get a little information, directions or just make contact with another human being. Some of my favourite portraits are of people I will never see again, and I find myself asking why I only do this when away from home.

Break

Continue reading “The Challenge”

Rolleiflex MX

Rollei

I’ve been trying to come to grips with how I ended up owning a 60-plus year old machine as a daily-and-only camera, after a truncated career with the latest and greatest at the time. I’m not sure if this will be a camera review or another personal journey into the philosophy of my own craft, but we’ll see what happens. This is a review of my Rolleiflex MX. Continue reading “Rolleiflex MX”

Rolleinar: it’s German for Sorcery

Lots of chatter about Rolleinars lately, I’ve only had mine since October ’15.

A Rolleinar is a set of close-up lenses that fit on the front of your Rolleiflex. This shortens the working distance to your subject at the cost of minimal distortion and arguable loss of quality. The magnifier goes down below on the taking lens and another magnifier with an oriented prism (the Rolleiparkeil) goes on the viewing lens to correct for parallax. Rolleinars come in four strengths, depending on the series of camera they’ve been made to fit. 1-4, with an ever decreasing working distance. You can also stack them, if you’re mad.  Continue reading “Rolleinar: it’s German for Sorcery”

The Human Landscape: Photographing Strangers

Seems to be a trend that many people would like to make more portraits but don’t know where to start. Being out and about is easy, lots of people enjoy bipedal photography in their hometowns or abroad. When you’ve photographed all the statuary and have creeped on all the great cars and been tossed out of all the coffee shops you’re left with the most intriguing and engaging part of any community. What makes the community. The people. Continue reading “The Human Landscape: Photographing Strangers”